Last edited by Tonos
Wednesday, July 29, 2020 | History

2 edition of Pine and juniper diseases in the Great Plains found in the catalog.

Pine and juniper diseases in the Great Plains

Glenn W. Peterson

Pine and juniper diseases in the Great Plains

by Glenn W. Peterson

  • 73 Want to read
  • 22 Currently reading

Published by Rocky Mountain Forest and Range Experiment Station, Forest Service, U.S. Dept. of Agriculture in [Fort Collins, Colo.] .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Pine -- Diseases and pests -- Great Lakes.,
  • Juniper -- Diseases and pests -- Great Lakes.

  • Edition Notes

    StatementGlenn W. Peterson.
    SeriesGeneral technical report RM -- 86.
    ContributionsRocky Mountain Forest and Range Experiment Station (Fort Collins, Colo.)
    The Physical Object
    Pagination47 p. :
    Number of Pages47
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL17654817M

    Juniper seed sources in the Great Plains. Gen. Tech. Rep. RMRS-GTR Fort Collins, CO: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station. 19 p. ABSTRACT At % of eastern redcedar (L.) and Rocky Mountain juniper (Sarg.) trees from several seed sources throughout the Great Plains had survived. The Austrian Pine also called the black pine is one of the toughest pine species widely spread across southern and eastern Mediterranean Europe as well as the mountainous regions of North Africa. These pine trees have gained prominence in the Midwestern US states due to their adaptability, bold texture, and fullness of foliage. Scientific Classification [ ].

    Juniperus scopulorum. As its name implies, Rocky Mountain Juniper is a common evergreen throughout the Rocky Mountains, extending into the Pine Ridge and Wildcat Hills of the Nebraska Panhandle. RM juniper is widely used in shelterbelts, wildlife plantings and landscape plantings in the western Great Plains. Many junipers (e.g. J. chinensis, J. virginiana) have two types of leaves; seedlings and some twigs of older trees have needle-like leaves 5–25 mm (– in) long, and the leaves on mature plants are (mostly) tiny (2–4 mm (– in)), overlapping, and juvenile foliage occurs on mature plants, it is most often found on shaded shoots, with adult foliage in full Class: Pinopsida.

    Filled with photos of stunning, inspiring trees, The Little Book of Bonsai provides simple, clear, effective guidance on bonsai care, including wiring, watering, pruning, pests, disease, tools, repotting, fertilizing, and more. Dupuich covers indoor and outdoor bonsai care, selecting the right container, displaying your bonsai, and choosing /5(27). The Southern pine beetle, for example, is a highly destructive pest that affects pines in the Southern U.S., and often the only “cure” is to remove the infested trees. But there are easier, less radical solutions to other problems. Check out this list to identify your pine Author: Lynn Coulter.


Share this book
You might also like
Epaminondas helps in the garden

Epaminondas helps in the garden

Sunny memories of foreign lands

Sunny memories of foreign lands

The history of Fort Riley.

The history of Fort Riley.

Some safety aspects of pesticides in the countryside

Some safety aspects of pesticides in the countryside

Time, gravitation and the universe

Time, gravitation and the universe

Oral Roberts scrapbook

Oral Roberts scrapbook

Stoopud fucken animals

Stoopud fucken animals

Building competency in two/three word verbs

Building competency in two/three word verbs

guide to technical writing.

guide to technical writing.

Science Voyages

Science Voyages

North Carolina public schools

North Carolina public schools

Forest and shade trees of Iowa

Forest and shade trees of Iowa

Advances in microwaves.

Advances in microwaves.

Colonial justice in Virginia

Colonial justice in Virginia

Opus Est

Opus Est

Campolonghi Group.

Campolonghi Group.

Doctor Pascal, or, Life and heredity

Doctor Pascal, or, Life and heredity

Pine and juniper diseases in the Great Plains by Glenn W. Peterson Download PDF EPUB FB2

Get this from a library. Pine and juniper diseases in the Great Plains. [Glenn W Peterson; Rocky Mountain Forest and Range Experiment Station (Fort Collins, Colo.)] -- The results of research on diseases of pines and junipers in the Great Plains are presented; diagnosis, biology, damage and control are emphasized.

Pine and Juniper diseases in the Great Plains: Peterson August Pages: Symptoms, biology and control are described for: Dothistroma needle blight [Scirrhia pini], brown spot needle blight (Scirrhia acicola), Naemacyclus needle cast (N.

minor), Diplodia blight (D. pinea) and western gall rust [Endocronartium harknessii] attacking Pinus in the USA; and Phomopsis blight (P.

juniperivora), Cercospora blight (C. sequoiae), and Kabatina blight (K. juniperi) attacking Cited by: Diseases of trees in the Great Plains (USDA Forest Service general technical report RM) [Riffle, Jerry W] on *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers.

Diseases of trees in the Great Plains (USDA Forest Service general technical report RM)Price: $ Pine and juniper diseases in the Great Plains / By Glenn W. Peterson and Colo.).

Rocky Mountain Forest and Range Experiment Station (Fort Collins. Abstract "August "Bibliography: p. Mode of access: Internet. A broad range of diseases associated with Rocky Mountain juniper attack the roots, stems, and foliage; but the most serious disease probably is a blight caused by Cercospora sequoiae.

Some shelterbelts in the Great Plains have lost most of their junipers from this disease. Leaf Spots of Nanking Cherry and Chokecherry Robert L. James and John E. Watkins Leaf spots are common diseases of Nanking cherry and chokecherry in the Great Plains.

Chokecherry is often planted in windbreaks; Nanking cherry. Juniper Twig Blight Junipers (Juniperus sp.), also known as red cedars are susceptible to a disease that results in the death of twig tips.

Save For Later Print. The species described in this handbook are native and introduced trees and shrubs of North Dakota that are hardy under the conditions given in the descriptions. Though not often used for lumber, these plants are valuable in North Dakota for: soil conservation, energy conservation, crop protection.

They all look great except I noticed yesterday a yellowing of the pine needles in several spots on the tree, I am concerned that this tree has what we call here in Oklahoma pine needle fungus. I was able to save one tree years ago by cutting off the brown needle branches, but these trees are at lease 60 feet tall/5(K).

commonly called pine nuts (see “Pine Nuts: A Utah Forest Product” in Utah Forest News, Fall ). Although there are two species of pinyon native to Utah, Colorado pinyon (Pinus edulis) and singleleaf pinyon (Pinus monophylla), they were used similarly by Native Americans, so Author: Beth Burritt.

Cedar rusts are common foliar diseases of rosaceous plants, such as hawthorn and crabapple. As with apple scab, some cultivars and species are more susceptible than others.

Rust diseases require junipers as an alternate host. Orange or rust-colored leaf spots form on hawthorn and crabapples in the spring. I fear for the Great Plains because many think they are boring.

91 I'll probably like this book more than you. I salivated over the possibilities of Great Plains after reading the author's Travels in Siberia.I went in with high hopes but acknowledge now that twenty-one years lapsed between this book and the Russian one, and Great Plains, as great as it is, reads, and was, the work of a 4/5.

Conifer Trees for Kansas A Guide to Landscape Evergreens Jason Griffin Ornamental Tree and Shrub Specialist Director, John C.

Pair Horticultural Center and Tim McDonnell Community Forestry Program Coordinator Kansas Forest Service Kansas State University Agricultural Experiment Station and Cooperative Extension System. Juniper, Bagworm Juniper, Botryosphaeria Canker Juniper, Brown Coloration Juniper, Cercospora Needle Blight Juniper, Kabatina Tip Blight Juniper, Phomopsis Tip Blight Juniper, Root Diseases Juniper Webworm.

Toulon Var. () 9-Murray and Batko, J.S. Murray, S. Batko, Dothistroma pini Hulbary: a new disease on pine in BritainForestry () Peterson, Glenn W. Peterson, Pine and Juniper diseases in the Great Plains USDA Forest Service General Technical Report RM () Ridgway, R.

Ridgway, Color standards and color Cited by: 6. Upright Conifer – Pinyon Pine, Slash Pine, Ash Juniper, Loblolly Pine, Japanese Black Pine and more. Additional Resources: Top Plants for North Texas. North Texas Plant Database. [ Back to Map ] Northeast and East Texas.

Grasses & Lawns (pdf) – Buffalograss, Bermudagrass, Zoysiagrass, Texas Bluegrass, Tall Fescue and more. Best books that take place in the United States Great Plains region (Colorado, Kansas, Montana, Nebraska, New Mexico, North Dakota, Oklahoma, South Dakota, Texas, and Wyoming) Score A book’s total score is based on multiple factors, including the number of people who have voted for it and how highly those voters ranked the book.

Tip blight is a fungal disease that affects Austrian, ponderosa, Scots, and mugo pines. The disease is most severe on mature trees (20 years or older). Repeated infec - tions over many years can kill large sections of trees or entire trees.

Pine Diseases in Kansas: Tip Blight, Dothistroma Needle Blight, and Pine Wilt Megan Kennelly, Plant File Size: KB. Diseases of Trees in the Great Plains This is a comprehensive, detailed text that discusses tree diseases that are common in our region.

It was written by a team of authors across the region, including KSU faculty. pages. Ponderosa Pine (Pinus ponderosa) Ponderosa pine is the state tree of Montana.

It is a very important tree for lumber. It grows from 50 to feet tall. The young trees are often called “black jack” or “bull pine,” and the older trees, “yellow pine.” Needles: Three File Size: 3MB. Dothistroma needle blight, pine-tree lappet moth, pinewood nematode Spruce - Norway (Picea abies) Great spruce bark beetle, 8-toothed spruce bark beetle, pine .Rocky Mountain Juniper.

Juniperus scopulorm, or Rocky Mountain juniper, is native to the Rocky Mountains and the Northwestern Great Plains. A mature height of 20 to 30 feet and spread 8 to 12 feet is typical, with a slow growth rate of 1 foot per year. NOTE: Rocky Mountain juniper is often confused with Eastern Redcedar.