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Saturday, July 25, 2020 | History

3 edition of Epidemiology of sudden infant death in North Carolina found in the catalog.

Epidemiology of sudden infant death in North Carolina

do cases tend to cluster?

by North Carolina. Public Health Statistics Branch

  • 252 Want to read
  • 36 Currently reading

Published by N.C. Dept. of Human Resources, Division of Health Services, Public Health Statistics Branch in Raleigh, N.C .
Written in English


Edition Notes

SeriesPHSB studies -- no. 16
The Physical Object
Pagination7 p. :
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL24589190M

  Adverse events, including apneic events, sudden infant death syndrome, and recurrent wheezing, will need to be monitored before and after vaccine implementation to assess safety. A better understanding of the epidemiology of these events prior to vaccine introduction would be important to differentiate background from vaccine-associated adverse Cited by: After years of steady decrease, North Carolina’s infant mortality rate went up for the second year in a row. By Rose Hoban More North Carolina newborns died in their first year of life last year, as the state’s infant mortality rate ticked up for the second year in a row. In , of every 1, [ ].

Spatial epidemiology is the description and analysis of the geographical distribution of disease. It is more important now than ever, with modern threats such as bio-terrorism making such analysis even more complex. This second edition of Statistical Methods in Spatial Epidemiology is updated and expanded to offer a complete coverage of the analysis and application of spatial statistical. Department of Maternal and Child Health W. Trinity Ave., # UNC Gillings School of Global Public Health Durham, NC CB# , Rosenau Hall The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Chapel Hill, North Carolina Email: [email protected] North Carolina Sudden Infant Death Syndrome Information and Counseling Project.

SUDDEN UNEXPECTED INFANT DEATH REPORT Infant mortality remains a public health concern both nationally and locally. In Wisconsin, the infant mortality rate between and was deaths for every 1, live births, compared to the United States rate of deaths for every 1, live births (WISH, , CDC, ). Peden Street Laurinburg, NC Phone: Fax:


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Epidemiology of sudden infant death in North Carolina by North Carolina. Public Health Statistics Branch Download PDF EPUB FB2

Chapter 13 The Epidemiology of Sudden Infant Death Syndrome and Sudden Unexpected Infant Deaths: Diagnostic Shift and other Temporal Changes. Carrie K Shapiro-Mendoza, PhD, MPH, Sharyn Parks, PhD, MPH, Alexa Erck Lambert, MPH, Lena Camperlengo, DrPH, Carri Cottengim, MA, and Christine Olson, MD.

Author InformationCited by: 1. Public records and public information compiled by the agencies of North Carolina government or its subdivisions are the property of the people (G.S.

§ ); consequently the State Library of North Carolina considers this item to be in the public domain according to Pages: The epidemiology of sudden infant death syndrome M Platt and P Pharoah FSID Unit of Perinatal and Paediatic Epidemiology, Department of Public Health, Muspratt Laboratory, Liverpool L69 3GB, by: Each Day in North Carolina vs Resident Events Live Births Fetal Deaths Infant Deaths.

This study describes the epidemiology of sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) among infants born during to upstate New York residents. Birth certificate characteristics for SIDS cases are compared with those of infants dying from other causes in the same age range, by: Between January 1, and DecemSudden Infant Death Syndrome cases were reported in North Carolina.

All but the out-of-state cases were mapped by county and city locations to determine if urban or rural cases predominated. The mapping was also undertaken to see if significant spatial variabilities could be detected between the county and city populations of infants at by: Epidemiology of the Sudden Infant Death Syndrome: Maternal, Neonatal, and Postneonatal Risk Factors Author links open overlay panel Howard J.

Hoffman MA a Laura S. Hillman MD b Cited by: Standfast SJ, Jereb S, Janerich DT. The epidemiology of sudden infant death in upstate New York. JAMA. Mar 16; (11)– [Steinschneider A.

Prolonged apnea and the sudden infant death syndrome: clinical and laboratory by: Sudden infant death syndrome – epidemiology and environmental factors 6 sharing were breastfeeding, sleeping problems and a single parent. Never using a pacifier was associated with a higher frequency of bed sharing but it was less common to bed share if the infant File Size: 7MB.

This map shows how sudden unexpected infant death (SUID) rates varied by state from through Among the 50 states and the District of Columbia (D.C.), Vermont had the lowest SUID rate ( perlive births) and Alabama had the highest SUID rate ( perlive births), more than five times the lowest rate.

A Simple Example: Sudden Infant Death in North Carolina. ACase Study: Malaria and IDDM. Infectious Disease Modelling. Introduction. GeneralModelDevelopment. SpatialModelDevelopment. Modelling Special Cases for Individual Level Data.

Survival Analysis with spatial dependence. Individual level data example. The book is extremely well referenced and most chapters are written in easily accessible, non-technical language. An excellent book that can be highly commended as a reliable source of up-to-date and comprehensive information on sudden infant death syndrome.

The Lancet, vol. Jan Format: Hardcover. The incidence of Sudden Infant Death Syndrome in North Carolina's cities and counties: – American Journal of Public Health,68, – PubMedCited by: The incidence of sudden infant death syndrome in North Carolina's cities and counties: Blok JH.

Between January 1, and DecemSudden Infant Death Syndrome cases were reported in North Carolina. All but the out-of-state cases were mapped by county and city locations to determine if urban or rural cases by:   SUID and SDY Case Registry.

As part of the Sudden Unexpected Infant Death (SUID) and Sudden Death in the Young (SDY) Case Registry, CDC’s Division of Reproductive Health supports SUID monitoring programs in 22 states and jurisdictions, covering about 1. Jack K. Leiss, Dianne Tyson, John D. Butts, C. Suchindran; RE: “AGE AND SEASON OF BIRTH IN SUDDEN INFANT DEATH SYNDROME IN NORTH CAROLINA, – NO INTCited by: 6.

Objective. To evaluate the epidemiology of sudden unexpected infant death (SUID) over a year period in the US, to assess the potential frequency of sudden unexpected postnatal collapse in the early days of life, and to determine if SUID rates in the neonatal period ( days) have changed in parallel with rates in the postneonatal periods, including the percentages attributed to codes that Cited by: J.K.

Leiss, C.N. SuchindrenAge and season of birth in sudden infant death syndrome in North Carolina, –; no interaction Am. Epidemiol., (), pp. Google ScholarCited by:   Sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) is a major cause of death in the postneonatal period.

SIDS peaks in the winter and at age 3 months. The hypothesis that season and age interact to determine SIDS survival was tested in race-specific hazards models that included an interaction term for season of birth and survival by: 6.

Epidemiology. Welcome to the Division of Epidemiology in the Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics at the University of South Carolina. and mental health issues after battling depression and losing a child to sudden infant death syndrome.

Read more. Anthony Alberg. Epidemiology and biostatistics professor and chair Anthony Alberg, a. 3. Froggatt P, Lynas MA, and MacKenzie G: Epidemiology of sudden unexpected death in infants ('cot death') in Northern Ireland, Br J Prev Soc Med4.

Spiers PS: Estimated rates of concordancy for the sudden infant death syndrome in twins, Am J EpidemiolCited by: Age and season of birth in sudden infant death syndrome in North Carolina, no interaction.

Leiss JK, Suchindran CM Am J Epidemiol, (2), 01 Jan for sudden infant death syndrome. Aust Paediatr J ; S Lejss JR and Suchindran CM, Age and season of birth in sudden infant death syndrome in North Carolina, No interaction.